The Rebel Beat 076: Lillian Allen Fights Back with Dub Poetry

 

Welcome back to another edition of The Rebel Beat, a Firebrand Records podcast!

Our special guest on the program this month is a Jamaican dub poet who is considered by some to be the god-mother of rap, hip-hop, and spoken word. She is a writer, educator, and grassroots activist, and we’ll meet her in just a little bit – Lillian Allen.

We’re part of the Channel Zero Network of anarchist podcasts, and the website just went live this week! Check it out for some good listening at http://www.channelzeronetwork.com.

On our Turn It Up segment, we give a shout out to a dope trans hip-hop artist and Black Lives Matter organizer in Montreal, Lucas Charlie Rose.

**If you dig our podcast and want to support us, tell a friend about The Rebel Beat, make sure you subscribe on any of your fave podcast platforms, and leave us a rating!
Also, donations are always appreciated. You send us Paypal donations at rebel@ckut.ca, or sign up on our Patreon page to get some nifty swag:
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* Playlist *

Morgan Heritage – Politician
D’bi Young w/ Assata Shakur – R/evolution
Linton Kwesi Johnson – Di great insohreckshan
Mutabaruka – Dis poem
Lillian Allen – Riddim an’ hardtimes
Lillian Allen – Fight back
Lillian Allen – Black voice
Lillian Allen – The subversives
Lucas Charlie Rose – This is what trans looks like

 

The Rebel Beat Podcast 032 – DJ Andy Williams and the Diaspora of Jazz

[audio https://archive.org/download/TheRebelBeatPodcast03209302015/The%20Rebel%20Beat%20podcast%20032_09302015.mp3]

Click here to download the podcast (right click ‘save link as’)

Welcome back to this week’s edition of The Rebel Beat podcast. On this show, it is our huge pleasure to welcome back our guest DJ Andy Williams of The Goods and the Jazz Amnesty Sound System. Andy is a veritable local DJ legend in Montreal, and this was the second time we’ve had him on The Rebel Beat, following his amazing set on jazz and the Civil Rights Movement for Black History Month.

Source: Vimeo.com

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The Rebel Beat Podcast 020 – Original Rebel Dread Don Letts on Race, Riots, and Making Music Dangerous Again

Source: 247 Magazine

[audio https://ia601509.us.archive.org/12/items/TheRebelBeatPodcast02006242015/The%20Rebel%20Beat%20podcast%20020_06242015.mp3]

Click here to download the podcast

Hello radio massive!

Welcome back to another weekly podcast of The Rebel Beat! It was a huge honour to welcome the legendary UK DJ Don Letts as our special guest on the show this week!

It is no exaggeration to say that punk rock would not be the same today were it not for Don Letts. As a staple on the early London punk rock scene, Don was best known as the DJ at the infamous club The Roxy. As a Londoner of Jamaican descent, Don famously brought reggae to the punks, hence starting a movement which bridged continents, genres, and brought together working class youth across racial lines. Continue reading

The Rebel Beat Podcast 009 – Linton Kwesi Johnson, Dub Poetry, and Black Resistance

lintonKwesiJohnson-1

[audio https://archive.org/download/TheRebelBealPodcast00904082015/The%20Rebel%20Beal%20podcast%20009_04082015.mp3]

Click here to download the podcast

Boom! Welcome back to another weekly podcast of The Rebel Beat, your regular dose of revolutionary music across different genres, and class war on the dance floor.

This week on the show, our special guest is the legendary British-Jamaican dub poet Linton Kwesi Johnson. Johnson hails from Clarendon, Jamaica, but immigrated to the UK in the early 60’s. From there, he got deeply involved in the Jamaican and Black diasporic reggae scenes, as well as political organizing at a time of fervent racial oppression in England. LKJ pioneered the genre of dub poetry, or dub lyricism, which combines Jamaican patois spoken word with deep reggae and dub grooves. His music amplifies the voices of Black youth who were clashing with police in the streets, and demanding dignified lives. Continue reading