The Rebel Beat 087: Sounding off with the anarchist music journalists

 

This month’s episode of The Rebel Beat podcast features an interview with two people who are huge inspirations for the work we do on this show – Ron Sakolsky and Sheila Knopper. They’re anarchists. They’re grassroots music journalists. They’re radio pirates. And among them, they’ve got a well of music knowledge deeper than the Pacific ocean.

Ron and Sheila live on Denman Island, also known by it’s Indigenous Comox name of “Sladaich”, in so-called British Columbia. On Denman, they helped start a long-running pirate radio project, Tree Frog radio. But even before then, they have a long legacy in community radio, music journalism, and the anarcho-surrealism movement.

In this interview, we’ll hear about some of their work over the decades to bridge music and radical politics. We’ll hear stories about smuggling poetry out of South African prisons, dub poetry in Toronto, and a mission with Pete Seeger.

** If you dig the Rebel Beat, support us!
www.patreon.com/rebelbeatradio

On our Turn It Up segment, we big up Moses Sumney, who recently pulled out of his gig at the Montreal Jazz Festival to protest against a racist play. Read all about it here

Check out Rebel Diaz and Ana Tijoux’s new video here

Check out some of Ron Sakolsky and Sheila Knopper’s writing here:
www.akpress.org/soundingoff.html
islandsofresistance.ca/

**Playlist**

Crashprez – Fascists don’t cry
Rebel Diaz feat. Ana Tijoux – Y va caer
Rage Against the Machine – Guerilla radio
Benjamin Zephaniah – Belly of de beast
Mzwakhe Mbuli – Behind the bars
Pete Seeger – Abiyoyo
Fela Kuti – Opposite people
Moses Sumney – Worth it

 

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The Rebel Beat 084: May Day Special!

 

May 1st is May Day. It is your day. It is our day. It is a day to take back time from the bosses, landlords, and rulers of this Earth, and a day to celebrate resistance.

Let this be your soundtrack.

The Rebel Beat is back with our annual May Day special podcast episode, and like last year, we recorded this one live at CKUT community radio in Montreal during a rousing session of World Skip The Beat.

You’ll hear a special May Day shout-out from Tom Morello of Rage Against The Machine & Prophets of Rage, an interview with CLAC – The anti-capitalist convergence of Montreal, Mostafa Henaway of the Immigrant Workers Centre, May Day greetings from some Rebel Beat listeners, and of course, 2 hours of resistance music from around the world.

** If you enjoy the Rebel Beat, support us!
www.patreon.com/rebelbeatradio

Our May Day special on Patreon is back by popular demand! Sign up on Patreon to support The Rebel Beat for only $2 per month, and we’ll mail you one of our beautiful Rebel Beat enamel pins! They are truly the perfect high-fashion for a riot against the ruling classes.

* Playlist *

Abdullah Ibrahim – Mannenberg is where it’s happening
Miriam Makeba & The Skylarks – Ekoneni
Mbongeni Ngema – Lizobuya
Seun Keuti & Egypt 80 – Corporate public control department
Didier Awadi -Ma révolution
Denis Brown – Revolution
Screechy Dan – Raise your glass (fi di working class)
King Zumbi feat. Delhi Sultanate – Riot police
Romain Virgo – Minimum wage
Oku Onuora – How long
Lillian Allen – I fight back
Ana Tijoux – Antipatriarca
Las Cafeteras – La bamba rebelde
Atis Indepandan – Papa-m monte oun bato
M.I.A. – Borders
Narcy – False flags
Il Nuovo Canzoniere Italiano – Bella Ciao
New Yiddish Chorale – Barrikadn (barricades)
Yiddish Glory – Mayn pulemyot (my machine gun)
Unknown Artist (Kurdistan) – Internationale

 

 

The Rebel Beat 076: Lillian Allen Fights Back with Dub Poetry

 

Welcome back to another edition of The Rebel Beat, a Firebrand Records podcast!

Our special guest on the program this month is a Jamaican dub poet who is considered by some to be the god-mother of rap, hip-hop, and spoken word. She is a writer, educator, and grassroots activist, and we’ll meet her in just a little bit – Lillian Allen.

We’re part of the Channel Zero Network of anarchist podcasts, and the website just went live this week! Check it out for some good listening at http://www.channelzeronetwork.com.

On our Turn It Up segment, we give a shout out to a dope trans hip-hop artist and Black Lives Matter organizer in Montreal, Lucas Charlie Rose.

**If you dig our podcast and want to support us, tell a friend about The Rebel Beat, make sure you subscribe on any of your fave podcast platforms, and leave us a rating!
Also, donations are always appreciated. You send us Paypal donations at rebel@ckut.ca, or sign up on our Patreon page to get some nifty swag:
www.patreon.com/rebelbeatradio

 

* Playlist *

Morgan Heritage – Politician
D’bi Young w/ Assata Shakur – R/evolution
Linton Kwesi Johnson – Di great insohreckshan
Mutabaruka – Dis poem
Lillian Allen – Riddim an’ hardtimes
Lillian Allen – Fight back
Lillian Allen – Black voice
Lillian Allen – The subversives
Lucas Charlie Rose – This is what trans looks like

 

The Rebel Beat Podcast 009 – Linton Kwesi Johnson, Dub Poetry, and Black Resistance

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Boom! Welcome back to another weekly podcast of The Rebel Beat, your regular dose of revolutionary music across different genres, and class war on the dance floor.

This week on the show, our special guest is the legendary British-Jamaican dub poet Linton Kwesi Johnson. Johnson hails from Clarendon, Jamaica, but immigrated to the UK in the early 60’s. From there, he got deeply involved in the Jamaican and Black diasporic reggae scenes, as well as political organizing at a time of fervent racial oppression in England. LKJ pioneered the genre of dub poetry, or dub lyricism, which combines Jamaican patois spoken word with deep reggae and dub grooves. His music amplifies the voices of Black youth who were clashing with police in the streets, and demanding dignified lives. Continue reading

Interview with Dub Poet Linton Kwesi Johnson coming up this week on The Rebel Beat

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This week on the show, we’ll be bringing you an interview with the legendary British-Jamaican dub poet Linton Kwesi Johnson. LKJ has been inspiring the masses for decades with his deep poetry and music on radical racial and social justice issues. His dub lyricism focuses mostly on the Black experience in the UK, but also on global issues.

Continue reading